Meet the instructor: Frances Peck Reply

Written by Carl Rosenberg; copy edited by Meagan Kus

On Saturday, April 22, Editors BC will present Frances Peck, who will give a full-day workshop called The Secrets of Syntax. In this workshop, participants will look at syntax from various angles and explore how to shape it for different kinds of texts, styles, and readers.

Frances Peck is a Certified Professional Editor (Hon.) and writer who has worked with words for over 25 years. She prepared the Canadian edition of The St. Martin’s Workbook, a grammar exercise book; co-authored the popular HyperGrammar website; and wrote Peck’s English Pointers, a collection of articles and quizzes available on the Language Portal of Canada. A partner with West Coast Editorial Associates, Frances teaches at Douglas College and UBC and gives workshops across Canada. She is also a sometime blogger and a fiction writer.

Carl Rosenberg, a volunteer on Editors BC’s communications and social media committee, spoke to Frances about her work on language and syntax. 

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Meet the instructor: Trena White Reply

Written by Carl Rosenberg; copy edited by Meagan Kus

Trena White

On Saturday, February 25, Editors BC will present Trena White, who will give a three-hour workshop on editing non-fiction book proposals. In this session, participants will learn how to help authors assemble book proposals that will open doors with agents and publishers.

Trena White is co-founder of Page Two, a Vancouver-based publishing agency specializing in non-fiction books, and an associate agent of Transatlantic Agency. Before launching Page Two, Trena was publisher of Douglas & McIntyre and Greystone Books, and a non-fiction editor at McClelland & Stewart. She is an adjunct professor in publishing at SFU.

Carl Rosenberg, a volunteer on Editors BC’s communications and social media committee, spoke to Trena about her advice on book proposals.

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PubPro 2015: Session summaries (part 2) 1

On April 25, EAC-BC co-hosted PubPro 2015, an unconference for managing editors and publication production specialists. We previously featured a recap of the event and part 1 of the session summaries. Part 2 of the session summaries follows.

Written by Amy Haagsma; copy edited by Meagan Kus

Change management: A guided discussion led by Chantal Moore

Chantal Moore is communications manager at the BC Council for International Education, a Crown corporation that facilitates international student exchanges. She was interested in discussing best practices for managing change.

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Event review: Writers on editors: An evening of eavesdropping Reply

Written by Amy Haagsma; copy edited by Meagan Kus

Recap of EAC-BC’s branch meeting on March 18, 2015.

On March 18, EAC-BC hosted authors Margo Bates and Daniel Francis for a panel discussion about working with editors. Jenny Lee, a writer, editor, and digital journalist with the Vancouver Sun, moderated, adding details of her own experience and encouraging questions from the audience.

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Profile of an aspiring editor: Interview with Reg Rozee 1

Written by Stephanie Warner; copy edited by Meagan Kus

Navy man, kung fu expert, Dungeons & Dragons player, musician, and movie extra! Meet Reg Rozee, editing student.

Reg is working toward an Editing certificate through SFU’s Writing and Communications program. He retired from the Canadian navy in spring 2014 and moved to Vancouver.

We met in a sunny Caffé Artigiano on Main Street. Unfortunately, Vancouver’s early spring had brought on a bad case of allergies. In spite of this, Reg enthusiastically talked about his naval career and his love of words. Sipping a large mocha helped his sore throat.

You’ve had a varied career path. Tell me about some of the stops along the way.
My first real career was the army. I’d just turned 20 and went to basic training. I was a radio operator and was posted to what was then called the Special Service Force. I spent four years there, and I did a UN tour in Iraq in 1988. More…

Confessions of a 24/7 editor 3

Written by Eric Damer; copy edited by Meagan Kus

Like many people who find themselves working as an editor, I grew up in a household of word enthusiasts. My father, an English teacher, methodically circled spelling and grammar errors in the local newspaper or identified errors in environmental print, but he also loved puns, spoonerisms, double-entendres, and wordplay of all sorts. Well before I turned to editing as a line of work, I knew the value of saying what you meant, and meaning what you said—unless you had a joke to tell. Now, it seems, I have difficulty turning off my error-checker for the sake of a chuckle.

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