April 19, 2017: Revitalizing Indigenous languages Reply

What: Editors BC monthly meeting
When: Wednesday, April 19, 2017, 7:00 pm (program begins at 7:30 pm)
Where: Welch Room, 4th floor, YWCA Health + Fitness Centre, 535 Hornby Street, Vancouver | map
Cost: Free for Editors Canada members and student affiliates, $10 for non-members, and $5 for non-member students with valid ID. Registration at the door.

Our April meeting promises to be a fascinating one as Nicki Benson of Kwi Awt Stelmexw presents an overview of Indigenous languages of British Columbia, current language revitalization initiatives and challenges, and the work of Kwi Awt Stelmexw regarding language education and place name reclamation.

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Book review: Yes, I Could Care Less 4

Written by Nancy Tinari; copy edited by Karen Barry

Review of “Yes, I Could Care Less: How to Be a Language Snob Without Being a Jerk” by Bill Walsh.

Yes I Could Care LessYes, I Could Care Less is a funny book for editors. It’s for editors because, like Bill Walsh, we care about words deeply. We recognize aspects of our own personalities in his self-mockery about his obsessive-compulsive quirkiness and his editorial pet peeves. It’s a book for editors rather than a general audience because Walsh, a copy editor at The Washington Post since 1997, tackles some of the most difficult copy-editing conundrums that often stymie editors. Topics include subject-verb agreement “follies” with expressions like “a lot” and “one of those people,” restrictive/non-restrictive clauses with their tricky use of commas and the which/that choice, how to handle trademarks, difficult decisions about hyphenation, and the pitfalls of typesetting technology.

Yes, I Could Care Less reveals what a subjective task editing can be. There are rules, style books, and house style guides, but there are many issues upon which even expert copy editors will not agree. The book opened my eyes about the potential for creativity and what Walsh calls “tiny acts of elegance” in editing work.

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Facts & #fails: April 12, 2014 Reply

EAC’s own Frances Peck is offering a full-day workshop that will get you thinking about the most misunderstood and contentious points of English usage.

Frances Peck has been an editor and writer for over 20 years. She teaches editing at Douglas College and Simon Fraser University and gives workshops across Canada. She is a partner with West Coast Editorial Associates.

What: Usage Woes and Myths with Frances Peck
When: 09:00-16:00, April 12, 2014
Where: 515 West Hastings Street, Room 1505, SFU Harbour Centre, Vancouver
Cost: $120 EAC members & $180 non-members (before March 22); $140 EAC members & $200 non-members (after March 22); registration closes April 4
More information & to register